Tweet without fear

3 tips for posting on Twitter

I have a love/hate relationship with Twitter.

It’s a great tool for connecting with other writers and editors in the field and for promoting Dragonfly’s work. On the other hand, there are so many different approaches to sharing content, that it’s hard to know where to start.

What time should I post? How often should I post? Does every tweet need an image? How much content should I share from other people? How much should I tweet about Dragonfly? And the questions go on and on.

Here are 3 things that’ll help you tweet without fear.

Just do it!

“Too much thinking leads to paralysis by analysis.” – Robert Herjavec

Overthinking is an enemy to getting started. Because of the numerous best practices out there, it can be hard to implement them all right away. In the perfectionist mindset, it’s easy to avoid posting until you’ve got everything sorted out. Don’t do that! Try out new ideas and don’t be afraid to fail.

There are some great best practices to follow. For example, Ann Wylie tells you to stop “we-we-ing on readers.” Your customers want to read content that’s relevant to them. They don’t want to hear all about you. Also, tweeting at optimum times will ensure more of your followers see your content. Here are the best times to post according to Buffer.

Don’t worry about getting all the best practices down right away. Starting is the most important thing you can do.

Just keep posting, posting…

Is it okay to share a post more than once a day or week? You bet! Twitter’s feed is constantly updating with all the content that’s being posted. So, if you only post a blog once, it easily gets lost in the shuffle.

Posting multiple times in a day or week increases the chance of your followers seeing and reading your post.

Have no fear, schedulers are here!

One of the biggest helps for posting to Twitter? A scheduler! I’ve used Buffer for over a year now, and my productivity has increased immensely. Schedulers give you the ability to schedule weeks in advance. Typically, I sit down for a few hours, and schedule social for the next week or two. Once it’s scheduled, I leave it be and focus on other work.

There’s a lot to learn about Twitter: how to post, when to post, etc… but don’t let that keep you from posting. Keep trying new things, and you’ll find your groove!

This post was written by Emilie Ferdelman, an operations and marketing assistant at Dragonfly Editorial.

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