Social media shift: What Facebook’s News Feed changes mean for your visibility

facebook-icon-on-smartphoneAlthough it’s not been around for all that long, it is difficult to remember life pre-Facebook. Like it or not, the social media platform has become an inextricable part of our daily lives.

For many, logging into Facebook has become as mundane as checking the mailbox, reading the newspaper, and even brushing one’s teeth. The platform is where we share a lot of ourselves: our thoughts, photos of loved ones and special places, articles that have hit a nerve and have piqued our interest.

And businesses of all shapes and sizes have found their way to the platform, too. For them, Facebook has become a valuable tool to interact with customers and often serves as a conduit to reach out to new ones as well.

But the way of doing digital business via Facebook is evolving.

Facebook shifts to “meaningful interactions”

On Thursday, January 11th, Facebook announced that changes were coming to the News Feed. In an attempt to amp up the focus on “meaningful interactions,” the algorithm will now prioritize posts from friends and family, over business and advertiser posts.

Since its 2004 launch, the now ubiquitous social media platform has seen several tweaks and modifications. Sometimes it’s a small adjustment, like being able to react to posts with more than just the spartan “thumbs up.” Other times, the instituted changes have been more structural and substantial – such as the change coming up just around the bend.

All this leaves businesses and organizations wondering: How will this impact our Facebook engagement?

Recalibrate your strategy

Social Media for Good offers some great tips for non-profit orgs to navigate Facebook, post-shift. And businesses: take note. These suggestions certainly apply beyond the non-profit sector.

In a nutshell? Consider paying for promoted posts and rethink and recalibrate your digital strategy, i.e., what role Facebook plays, in and of itself, and as part of your wider digital strategy.

The proposed Facebook News Feed modifications also have publishers questioning whether focusing their energies on Twitter might prove more fruitful for driving traffic. According to a recent BuzzFeed News article, “…In October 2017, Facebook sent 4.7 visitors to publishers per post for every one visitor Twitter sent, according to data from SocialFlow…This month, Facebook is sending just 2.5 visitors to publisher sites per post for every one sent by Twitter.”

Going forward, it’s worth remembering that while growing pains can be difficult, change isn’t always a bad thing. Take the time to thoughtfully consider and recalibrate your outreach strategy if need be. Depending on how you approach it, your challenge could prove to be little more than an excellent opportunity in disguise.

 

This post was written by Becky Harris Sullivan, a writer at Dragonfly Editorial.

< Previous PostBack to BlogNext Post >

Let's talk about your next project!


Share this Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *